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September 26, 2021

Professional Tool Reviews for Pros


Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver Review

Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver
PTR Review
  • Overall Rating 8.8

We love the design of Metabo HPT's Triple Hammer Impact Driver and its performance is excellent. However, being tied to the larger MultiVolt battery is a downside for a tool like this, and the performance gains over the 18V model aren't massive. Unless you're exclusively using MultiVolt tools, we recommend the 18V option paired with compact batteries and a lighter way to go.

Overall Score 8.8 (out of 10)

Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver Offers 36V Option

Out of dozens of impact drivers that we’ve tested head-to-head, the Metabo HPT MultiVolt 36V Triple Hammer Impact Driver (WH36DBQ4) is one of the most unique with its 3-hammer design.


It’s also one of the first tools we’ve put through its paces since the rebranding from the Hitachi name. You can run these MultiVolt tools on their 36V battery pack or from an AC power unit that plugs into the wall.

Testing the Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver

Metabo HPT boasts 1859 in-lbs of torque, 2900 RPM, and 4100 IPM. We put through a series of tests to see how those specs translate into working power.

18V or 36V?

Technically, the Metabo HPT WH36DBQ4 runs at 36V. It’s essentially the same tool as the 18V Triple Hammer, just wired for the MultiVolt battery. Metabo HPT had a choice: Run at 18V and call it higher amp-hours or run at 36 and call it fewer. Either way, the battery has the same watt-hours of energy available, but there’s an advantage to running at a higher voltage to boost power.

Speed Under Load

The Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver puts up some pretty solid speed specs. Under load, this tool can turn out 562 RPM with a 1/4-inch ledger screw. That’s pretty quick—and seemingly a direct result of the triple hammering action. It makes even more of a difference when you’re driving drywall or deck screws.

This result puts the Metabo HPT in the upper tier for speed in this test.

driving lag bolts into layered OSB

Fastening Torque

The Metabo HPT MultiVolt 36V Triple Hammer Impact Driver excels at torquing down fasteners. One of only three in the test group to eclipse the 2500 in-lb mark, it joins Milwaukee’s Gen 3 M18 Fuel and Kobalt’s 24V Max at the top of the charts.

This test doesn’t actually measure the true fastening torque, though. It measures how much torque it takes to break its hardest fastening efforts.

Metabo HPT WH36DBQ4

Nut-Busting Torque

With the fastening torque output of this tool, it’s a little surprising that it doesn’t put up better breakaway torque numbers. This is not to say that it performs poorly in this category, but it drops a few places. It can produce 3000 in-lbs (250 ft-lbs!) of breakaway torque. While that’s a mid-pack finish, it’s more than enough power for what most Pros need in the field.

Metabo HPT MultiVolt Impact Driver

Overall, the Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer impact driver is a high-performing model that you don’t need to be baby when you have larger or longer screws to drive.

Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver Size and Weight

You might find the Metabo HPT 36V Triple Hammer Impact Driver somewhat problematic in weight. As a bare tool, this impact driver weighs only 2.1 lbs, which is among the lightest tools we tested. It’s also only 5″ long and 7.8″ tall.

However, when you throw on the MultiVolt 4.0/8.0Ah battery pack, you double the weight and add 2.5″ more to the height.

Metabo HPT 36V Impact Driver

The battery affects the balance of the tool, making it extremely bottom-heavy. However, there is a somewhat smaller 2.5/5.0Ah battery that can shave some of the weight down.


That said, their 18V model has the exact same footprint and you can work with one of their compact 3.0 Ah batteries to save some weight.

Noise Level

We measured the sound levels of each tool under load to see which impact drivers would present the most menace to your hearing faculties. Admittedly, there’s really no such thing as a quiet impact driver (unless you count the hydraulic models). Our decibel measurements ranged from 97 dB(a) to 105 dB(A).

torque testing

The Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver winds up right in the middle of the pack, making 101 dB(A) worth of noise.

Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver Features

  • Triple Hammer Technology: Metabo HPT has incorporated a third impacting anvil with this model. This increases driving speeds, beats per minute, and torque while simultaneously decreasing vibrations.
  • IP56 rating: We don’t see too many impact drivers that showcase a lot of water and dust protection, but the Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver does. No one intentionally drops their cordless tools in a bucket of water but it’s one of the features Metabo HPT shows off at trade shows.
  • 4-stage mode selection control board

Other Features

Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver Price

The Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver retails for $349 with a pair of 4.0/8.0Ah MultiVolt batteries. You can also get it as a bare tool for $219.

The Bottom Line

We love the design of Metabo HPT’s Triple Hammer Impact Driver and its performance is excellent. However, being tied to the larger MultiVolt battery is a downside for a tool like this, and the performance gains over the 18V model aren’t massive. Unless you’re exclusively using MultiVolt tools, we recommend the 18V option paired with compact batteries and a lighter way to go.

Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver Specifications

  • Model: Metabo HPT WH36DBQ4
  • Power source: 36V
  • No Load Speed: 0-900 RPM, 0-2,900 RPM
  • Maximum Torque: 1,859 in-lbs
  • Impact Rate: 0-2,000 BPM, 0-4,100 BPM
  • Bare Weight: 2.3 lbs
  • Weight with battery: 4.2 lbs
  • Length: 5″
  • Height: 7.8″
  • Warranty: Lifetime warranty on tool body
  • Price: $219 bare, $349 kit

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Matt Engel

I wish we seen the broader Hitachi 18 and multivolt line in Canada. Their 18v nailers are great. I gave up waiting for Milwaukee to get a framer out and have heard very mixed stories about their finishing lineup.

John

I have mixed feelings about Hitachi –> Metabo HPT. I own a bunch of Hitachi power tools, 4 cordless nailers, 2 18v hammer drills, 2 18v triple hammer impacts, 18v sds-plus hammer drill, 18v multi-tool and a stable of 3ah batteries, 1 6ah and 1 MV batt which works as twice the ah on the 18v tools. I don’t have desire to own any of the new M-HPT hand power tools because the MV batteries are stupidly oversized and heavy and those tools aren’t backward compatible with the awesome 3ah batteries (which at $30 each are great for size, capacity… Read more »

Mark Griffin

Pro Tool Reviews I’m trying to comprehend this whole Metabo and Hitachi buy out. Does manufacturing remain the same as before and hitachi just using Metabo’s name to try and sell mediocre tools as high end tools. I’ve noticed a significant price increase just on the standard line not mentioning the multi volt just because of a rebrand. Even tools branded hitachi still, have increased as well.

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