Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver Cordless Drill Reviews & Impact Drivers

18v/20V Max Impact Drivers

Speed Under Load
Measurable Torque
Weight
Feature Set
Value
Final Thoughts

There's no getting around the fact that the Metabo HPT's MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver has some weight and bulk to it with the size of its battery. However, it rises up from Hitachi's typically lower rankings to genuine professional consideration. The main attraction for going with this model of their 18V version is the ability to use their AC adapter if the need arises. Aside from that, the two tools have identical footprints and you may prefer the lighter weight of compact batteries.  Metabo HPT is backing this with a lifetime tool warranty and you can choose between a battery starter kit and an AC adapter when you buy it.

Overall Score 3.9 Shootout Results

Metabo HPT (Hitachi) MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver Review


Hefty Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver Takes a Top Half Finish

Out of 30 impact drivers that we brought in for head to head testing, the Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver came in 7th place in the 18V class. It’s one of the first tools we’ve put through its paces since the rebranding from the Hitachi name. You can run these MultiVolt tools on their 36V battery pack or from an AC power unit that plugs into the wall.

Metabo HPT WH36DBQ4 36V Shootout Results

  • 18V Ranking: 7th place out of 16
  • Speed Under Load: 562 RPM (4th place)
  • Fastening Torque: 2501 in-lbs (2nd place)
  • Nut-Busting Torque: 3000 in-lbs (tie, 6th place)
  • Decibels: 101 dB(A)  (tie, 8th place)
  • Weight: 4.2 pounds with 36V battery (15th place)
  • Footprint: 5.0″ head length, 7.8″ height without battery (tie, 3rd place)
  • Feature Set: Highlighted by Triple Hammer impact mechanism and MultiVolt battery platform (tie, 6th place)
  • Value: $379 kit with one battery or AC adapter (tie, 13th place) 

Takeaway

There’s no getting around the fact that the Metabo HPT’s MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver has some weight and bulk to it with the size of its battery. However, it rises up from Hitachi’s typically lower rankings to genuine professional consideration. The main attraction for going with this model of their 18V version is the ability to use their AC adapter if the need arises. Aside from that, the two tools have identical footprints and you may prefer the lighter weight of compact batteries.

Metabo HPT is backing this with a lifetime tool warranty and you can choose between a battery starter kit and an AC adapter when you buy it.

* Results as of February 11, 2019. Head over to our Best 18V Impact Driver page for updated results as new models hit the market.

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Performance

The two main performance areas we test impact drivers are speed and torque. Head over to our Best Impact Driver main page to get the details of our testing methods.

Speed Under Load

The Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver puts up some pretty solid speed specs. Under load, this tool can turn out 562 RPM, which is pretty quick as a result of the triple hammering action. It makes even more of a difference when you’re driving drywall or deck screws.

This result puts the Metabo HPT in 4th place. However, the differences between 2nd and 4th places are negligible, with a swing of just 11 RPM between them.

Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver

 

Fastening Torque

The Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver excels at torquing down fasteners. One of only two models we tested eclipse the 2500 in-lb mark, the Metabo HPT finishes in 2nd place in this category. Only Milwaukee’s Gen 3 M18 Fuel impact driver produces more fastening torque in our testing.

Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver

 

Nut-Busting Torque

With the fastening torque output of this tool, it’s a little surprising that it doesn’t put up better breakaway torque numbers than it does. This is not to say that it performs poorly in this category, but it drops a few places. It can produce 3000 in-lbs (250 ft-lbs!) of breakaway torque, which places it in a 6-way tie for 6th place in our shootout.

Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver

Overall, the MultiVolt Triple Hammer is a high-performing impact driver that you don’t need to be baby when you have larger or longer screws to drive.

Wait, Is This an 18V Tool or 36V?

Technically, the Metabo HPT WH36DBQ4 runs at 36V. It’s essentially the same tool as the 18V Triple Hammer wired for the MultiVolt battery. Metabo HPT had a choice – run at 18V and call it higher amp hours or run at 36 and call it fewer. Either way, the battery has the same watt-hours of energy available, but there’s an advantage to running at the higher voltage to boost power.

Weight and Footprint

You might find the Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver somewhat problematic in weight. As a bare tool, this impact driver weighs only 2.1 lbs, which is among the lightest tools we tested. It’s also only 5″ long and 7.8″ tall.

However, when you throw on the MultiVolt 36V battery pack, you double the weight and add 2.5″ more to the height.

Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver

The battery affects the balance of the tool, making it extremely bottom-heavy. If you’re committed to the MultiVolt platform, it’s good to have an impact driver available. However, their 18V model has the exact same footprint and you can work with one of their compact 3.0 Ah batteries to save some weight.

Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver

Decibels

We measured the sound levels of each tool under load to see which impact drivers would present the most menace to your hearing faculties. Admittedly, there’s really no such thing as a quiet impact driver (unless you count the hydraulic models), and our decibel ranges from 97 dB(a) to 105 dB(A).

The Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver winds up right in the middle of the pack. It finishes in a 4-way tie for 8th, making 101 dB(A) worth of noise.

Feature Set

  • Triple Hammer Technology: Metabo HPT has incorporated a third impacting anvil with this model. This increases driving speeds, beats per minute, and torque while simultaneously decreasing vibrations.
  • IP56 rating: We don’t see too many impact drivers that showcase a lot of water and dust protection, but the Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver does. No one intentionally drops their cordless tools in a bucket of water but it’s one of the features Metabo HPT shows off at trade shows.
  • 4-stage mode selection control board

Other Features

Value

The Metabo HPT MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver retails for $379 with a battery/charger or AC adapter. This is on the high side of the scale creeping up toward Hilti pricing. For what you get in performance, it scores 67 points out of 100 on our value scale, landing it in a tie for 13th place.

If you’re going all-in on the MultiVolt platform and aren’t pursuing anything on Metabo HPT’s 18V side, grab this model knowing it’s backed by a lifetime tool warranty.

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The Bottom Line

It’s tough to imagine buying into the Metabo HPT MultiVolt platform based on the impact driver alone. It has excellent performance, but its bulk holds it back. If you’re looking to the hybrid power source system for its table saw, miter saw, or rotary hammer, this is a nice supplement to the line.

Metabo HPT WH36DBQ4 36V MultiVolt Triple Hammer Impact Driver Specifications

  • Model: Metabo HPT WH36DBQ4
  • Power source: 36V
  • No Load Speed: 0-900 RPM, 0-2,900 RPM
  • Maximum Torque: 1,859 in-lbs
  • Impact Rate: 0-2,000 BPM, 0-4,11 BPM
  • Bare Weight: 2.3 lbs
  • Weight with Battery: 4.2 lbs
  • Length: 5″
  • Height: 7.8″
  • Warranty: Lifetime warranty on tool body
  • Price: $379

 

 

 

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Matt Engel
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I wish we seen the broader Hitachi 18 and multivolt line in Canada. Their 18v nailers are great. I gave up waiting for Milwaukee to get a framer out and have heard very mixed stories about their finishing lineup.

John
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John

I have mixed feelings about Hitachi –> Metabo HPT. I own a bunch of Hitachi power tools, 4 cordless nailers, 2 18v hammer drills, 2 18v triple hammer impacts, 18v sds-plus hammer drill, 18v multi-tool and a stable of 3ah batteries, 1 6ah and 1 MV batt which works as twice the ah on the 18v tools. I don’t have desire to own any of the new M-HPT hand power tools because the MV batteries are stupidly oversized and heavy and those tools aren’t backward compatible with the awesome 3ah batteries (which at $30 each are great for size, capacity… Read more »

Mark Griffin
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Pro Tool Reviews I’m trying to comprehend this whole Metabo and Hitachi buy out. Does manufacturing remain the same as before and hitachi just using Metabo’s name to try and sell mediocre tools as high end tools. I’ve noticed a significant price increase just on the standard line not mentioning the multi volt just because of a rebrand. Even tools branded hitachi still, have increased as well.