fbpx
October 22, 2021

Professional Tool Reviews for Pros


Ridgid Octane JobMax Multi-Tool Review

Ridgid 18V JobMax Octane cuts
PTR Review
  • Overall Rating 8.4

Ridgid Octane has been flexing its muscle with some impressive tools lately - and the new JobMax is no exception. We used it as an oscillating tool and sander and found it excels with lots of power and runtime. You also have options to add a jigsaw, recip saw, metal sheers, right angle drill, and right angle impact head for around $50 each. It won't replace your tool fleet, but Octane's capability allows the JobMax to more closely approximate dedicated tools. We'd like it to be easier to remove/rotate the heads and the spring-loaded blade exchange lever can snap back on your hand if you're not careful. But all things considered, the souped-up Octane JobMax means versatility at a great price.

Overall Score 8.4 (out of 10)

We think of the Ridgid Octane JobMax Multi-Tool like this: Buy it for the oscillating tool. Then, benefit from the whole 7-tool suite if you decide to purchase the other heads separately. Having already played with the Ridgid 18V JobMax multi-tool, the Octane “big brother” oscillating tool and sander came in handy on the job site. In fact, it has come in handy enough times to pay for itself several times over.


Pros

  • Performs seven different functions using interchangeable heads (sold separately): sander, jigsaw, oscillating tool, reciprocating saw, metal shears, right angle drill, and right angle impact
  • Handy for cutting drywall, trim, and anything involving plunge cuts
  • Each head can be rotated in four positions around the power base
  • Lots of power and runtime from the Octane battery system

Cons

  • Spring-loaded lever provides tool-free blade changes but can snap back on your hand painfully if you’re not careful
  • It’s hard to press the buttons to remove the head
  • The work light doesn’t rotate with the head

Ridgid Octane JobMax Performance

Back and Forth

Like the impact driver, the oscillating tool is in the What did we do before we had them? category. Our crew uses them for flooring, finish work, rough-ins, general carpentry—you name it. After our first experience with the impressive Octane Megamax, the Ridgid Octane JobMax Multi-Tool sounded like a fine idea to us.


Ridgid Octane 18V JobMax cutting

It turns out we were right. When you take an eminently useful tool and boost the power and runtime, you get something special. It can certainly out-cut any of its peers—at least any we’ve used. Plunge cuts, flush cuts, on-the-fly mortises, trim work, making holes in drywall—we always take the JobMax along. It seems like there’s always something it can do better than another tool. We’re not sure if it’s the best oscillating multi-tool on the market, but it has plenty of power.

Heads on a Swivel

As is usually the case, we couldn’t resist playing with the Ridgid Octane JobMax Multi-Tool as soon as we got it to the shop. You know, before it did any “real” work. We cut some quick field mortises and used the sanding head to ease some edges.

Ridgid Octane JobMax plunge cut

Of course, those are just two of the JobMax’s seven functions. For around $50 each, you can also pick up a jigsaw, recip saw, metal sheers, right angle drill, and right angle impact. We don’t have those yet (do we smell a future review update?) but all indications are that they work well.

Ridgid JobMax Octane connect

All is not perfect with the Ridgid Octane JobMax Multi-Tool, though. The buttons that release the head from the power base are stubbornly hard to push—at least simultaneously, which is what you need to do to switch heads or rotate it to one of its four positions. We had the same experience with the Octane 7-inch Grinder’s buttons. Also, the work light is on the power base and therefore doesn’t swivel as you rotate the head. That’s a bit of a nitpicky caveat, but it’s worth pointing out that the light will only illuminate your work in the “standard” position.

Ridgid JobMax Octane angled

Spring Forward

You’ve probably seen about as many tool-free oscillating blade change mechanisms as there are manufacturers. The Ridgid Octane JobMax Multi-Tool’s uses a spring-loaded lever that can snap back on your hand if you’re not careful. It holds the blade and sanding block very tightly, but it’s still not our favorite part of the design.

Ridgid JobMax Octane detail sanding

A lot of guys on our crew are big fans of Ridgid because of the Lifetime Service Agreement (LSA). If you’ve had difficulty registering for the LSA in the past, RIDGID has streamlined the process considerably, It’s also nice to know that if you do register the JobMax, it’s covered.

Price

The Ridgid Octane JobMax Multi-Tool is in a class of its own. Its competitors only offer a couple of functions—usually an oscillating tool and a sanding tool. The bare Octane Jobmax comes in at $129 which we think is quite a deal given its capabilities.

The Bottom Line

Ridgid Octane has been flexing its muscle with some impressive tools lately. The new JobMax is no exception. We used it as an oscillating tool and sander and found it excels with lots of power and runtime.

You also have options to add a jigsaw, recip saw, metal sheers, right angle drill, and right angle impact head for around $50 each. It won’t replace your tool fleet, but Octane’s capability allows the JobMax to more closely approximate dedicated tools.

We’d like it to be easier to remove/rotate the heads and the spring-loaded blade exchange lever gave us some difficulty. Still, all things considered, the souped-up Octane JobMax means versatility at a great price.

Ridgid JobMax Octane Multi-Tool heads

Ridgid Octane JobMax Multi-Tool Specifications

  • Model: R862105B
  • Speed: 0-20,000 OPM
  • Oscillation angle: 4°
  • Brushless motor
  • Variable speed
  • Dimensions (HxWxD): 3.5 x 3.25 x 13.4 in.
  • Weight: 3.2 lbs.
  • Warranty: Ridgid Lifetime Service Agreement
  • Price: $129 (bare tool)

Related articles

Ridgid 28-Inch Mobile Job Box 249646

Ridgid Mobile Job Box Extends Storage Without Losing Stackable Function One of the stars of the Ridgid Pro tool storage system is the Mobile Job Box, an extra-wide box designed to make transporting your longer and bulkier tools easier. Ridgid Rolling Tool Box Basics The Ridgid Mobile Job Box is part of the brand’s modular […]

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
3 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Tom Cook

Recently picked this up with the RA impact head to replace my ancient 12v NiCad Ridgid RA impact driver. I have only used it a few times with both the impact and OMT heads. Those heads are sure a pain to get off! Most of the time it is a 3 hand job. One to hold the body, one to hold the two buttons down, and one to pull the head. I hope as they break in a bit I won’t have to get another person to help me remove the head.

Chris Ludston

I have had the corded job max for about a year. I also have many Rigid 18v tools, and love them. They last a long time, and have plenty of power, for most jobs. You cant expect to RIP 2 x 12s all day, with any battery tool, but when I do handyman repairs, the 18v set is all I carry. As far as job max, I’m sure it will do a great job, espex6with a 5 or 6 ah battery. I’m going to but the 18v jobmax very soo, seeing that I already have most of the heads, for… Read more »

no mama

Does the job. Does not last. Overheats easily. Been through 5 linear saw heads in 18 months. They wear out easily.

3
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x