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October 23, 2021

Professional Tool Reviews for Pros


Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw SPT70WT-22 Review

PTR Review
  • Pro Review 8.8

Skilsaw's first worm drive table saw is lightweight and compact with Pro-level performance and a price that will raise some eyebrows.

Overall Score 8.8 (out of 10)

We’re in the beginning stages of preparing for a jobsite table saw shootout and one of the first models that has come in is the new Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw. There are plenty of reasons to be excited about it. First and foremost, it’s a worm drive and that means more torque.


Note: Check out our review of the Skilsaw SPT99T-01 8-1/4″ table saw

Skilsaw is really owning their reputation as makers of worm drive saws. Following the Skilsaw re-branding, they really pushed their circular saw line, including the Skilsaw SPT67WM-22 and Skilsaw SPT67WL-01 sidewinders we reviewed. Since then, we’ve seen the push for worm drive circular saws, the table saw that is our guest of honor today, and a new metal cutting saw.

The extra torque from a worm drive is excellent for the higher-stress rip cuts that a table saw has to endure by nature. The trade-off is typically some additional weight and a slower blade speed – but Skilsaw has managed to buck both trends.

Skilsaw SPT70WT-22 First Impressions

Our Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw came with a basic stand (SPTA70WT-ST) and Skilsaw gets major kudos for making assembly really easy. All it took to get the stand together was the included eight nuts, bolts, and washers along with a pair of pliers and an impact driver. We’re talking 5-minute assembly, maybe less. The stand uses snap clips to hold the saw in place so you’re ready to go very quickly.

Skilsaw’s stand strays from the idea that a job site stand needs to be wheeled. We can attribute this to its light weight. While it loses points for portability because you have to carry it, Skilsaw’s stand is extremely stable. Another benefit of going with this simple stand design is that it is certainly responsible for dropping the price point. Skilsaw is definitely the table saw you want to go with if you’re having to move your saw in and out of a truck bed rather than being able to wheel it up in a trailer.

Best Portable Jobsite Table Saw Shootout - Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw Stability

Installing the Skilsaw 10-inch Table Saw Hardware

The saw itself requires the typical installation of the anti-kickback pawls and guard assembly to the riving knife. If you’ve done this before, you won’t find any surprises.


Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw SPT70WT-22 Blade Guard

The -22 designation in the model number means the Skilsaw SPT70WT-22 comes with a Diablo blade. In this case, it’s a 30 tooth carbide designed for rip cutting.

Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw SPT70WT-22 Diablo 30T Blade

Digging deeper, you’ll find that the 15 amp Dual-Field motor is the first in the industry to be driven by a brass geared worm drive. It’s capable of making a standard 3-1/2″ cut at 90 degrees. You’ll also find a standard 25-inch rip cutting capacity on the tabletop.

The build quality seems solid on the surface. There are no surprises as all the standard adjustments are in place and are smooth out of the box. The fence and extension both slide easily and lock in place with little reason for doubt in their respective holding abilities. In short, Skilsaw looks to have done a fine job with the design – we just need to make some sawdust to prove it.

Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw SPT70WT-22 Extension

Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw Specifications

  • Model: Skilsaw SPT70WT-22
  • Motor: 15 amp, Dual-Field
  • Blade Diameter: 10″
  • No Load Speed: 5300 RPM
  • Included Blade: 30T Diablo Carbide Tip
  • Weight: 49 pounds
  • Max Cut Depth: 3-1/2″ @ 90 degrees, 2-1/4″ @ 45 degrees
  • Warranty: 1 year, 180 money back
  • Price: $379

Now That We’ve Made Some Sawdust…

If you’ve been using, well, anyone else’s job site table saw, you’re going to be pleasantly surprised by the weight. At 49 pounds, the Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw is the lightest we tested in our recent Portable Jobsite Table Saw Shootout – including the traditionally lightweight value brands.

Best Portable Jobsite Table Saw Shootout - Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw Weight

Also bucking the trend of worm drives is the no-load speed. Skilsaw had the highest at 5300 RPM. Did that translate into a better cutting experience?

Yes and no.

Skilsaw’s cutting speed and quality are right in the middle of what we expect from professional brands. So from that perspective, it didn’t really blow us away. On the other hand, when you look at the cutting experience in the weight class, nothing else comes close.

Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw SPT70WT-22 Diablo 30T Blade Cutting

Blade changes are a little easier thanks to a blade lock lever. I don’t particularly care for the two-tool approach to loosening the nut, especially when you consider that a blade lock exists on virtually every other circular bladed saw on the market. This is a feature that should be standard on every table saw and Skilsaw gets bonus points for including it.

Conclusions

The Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw gets back to what a job site table saw should be – fully functional while keeping the weight down with a compact design. Cutting performance along with fence and extension quality matches what we expect for a professional-level tool in this class. Where Skilsaw really excels is with its weight, size, and stability. The bonus with all this is the attractive price point.

I can heartily recommend the Skilsaw Worm Drive Table Saw to any professional that needs a truly portable job site table saw. Users that don’t mind trading off a wheeled stand for lighter weight and stability will appreciate it. This model is a must-have for the Pro who needs to load and unload from the bed of a truck rather than a trailer.

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Paul H

Ive owned two Bosch portables, and this Skill kicks butt. It does vibrate a little on start up. I think its just becouse of the powerfull motor. Im a carpenter, and have used/abused this saw for two years. Rain, mud, snow, bullet proof workhorse. Not fancy. I personaly have never had a problem with the blade lowering. I miss the fancy fence on occasion, but for me its just somthing to break on the jobsite. I’m not building cabinets. I need simplicity, function, power, and reliability. It hasn’t dissapionted. If your a DIYer any saw will work, and you can… Read more »

S. Maddox

I just bought this saw and was totally disappointed. There is lots of vibration and the blade lowers itself while cutting. This is super unsafe and makes any sort of accurate dado and rabbit cuts impossible. When the blade height is set properly for a cut it often drops below the wood during the cut necessitating re-adjustment mid cut. I was able to adjust out some of the inherent vibration but couldn’t do anything about the blade height issue. It is possible I got a lemon but looking at the overall build quality leaves me skeptical.

Chris Mick

Has anyone had issues with the blade wobbling side to side when raising and lowering? I returned my first one because it seemed to be from damage during shipping. Now the second appears to have the same issue.

Mark

Having owned this saw since March, I agree with everything in the article, though after having a couple of DeWalt table saws, I really miss the rack and pinion fence. The depth of cut is a big plus over most other job site table saws. Saw is very stable with the included stand.

Kevin Gleason

I’ll bet the price is right

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