Cordless Vacuum Reviews

Cordless Vacuums

Pro Rating
Final Thoughts

The Ridgid cordless wet dry vacuum is a no-compromise battery-powered replacement for a corded 9-gallon vac. It has the power to clean up wet and dry messes effectively and is capable of well over an hour of runtime when you use both of its battery ports.

Overall Score 4.5 Pro Review

Ridgid Cordless Wet Dry Vacuum Review


Ridgid Cordless Wet Dry Vacuum Offers a No-Compromise Battery-Powered Solution

While there are options in the cordless vacuum sector, most brands shy away go going full-size. The Ridgid cordless wet dry vacuum bucks the trend with a 9-gallon design that’s surprisingly powerful.

Pros

  • Uses Ridgid 18V power tool batteries, including Octane
  • Powerful enough suction to pick up nails and screws
  • Sucks 5 gallons of water in less than 10 seconds
  • Two battery ports extend runtime beyond an hour

Cons

  • No kit options available

Recommendation

The Ridgid cordless wet dry vacuum is a no-compromise battery-powered replacement for a corded 9-gallon vac. It has the power to clean up wet and dry messes effectively and is capable of well over an hour of runtime when you use both of its battery ports.

We love this model as a primary option for mobile car cleaning and jobsite cleanup where power is unavailable or at a premium. Its convenience also makes it a great option for any garage or shop. 

SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERS

Suction Power

The Ridgid cordless wet dry vacuum runs on any Ridgid 18V battery from the power tool side of the business (not the Ridgid Emerson plumbing tools). Everything from their 1.5Ah packs all the way through 9.0Ah Octane batteries work. It’s not a hybrid AC/DC model, though.

Home Depot lists the airflow at 82 CFM, which isn’t much more than we saw with Ryobi’s cordless 6-gallon shop vac. They don’t list a water lift number and that’s an important part of the suction power equation.

I went in with the expectation that I’d be able to vacuum up dirt, sawdust, and maybe smaller wood chips. What I found is that its brushed motor is capable of much more, even clearing 3″ nails and screws that I thought would be too heavy for it to move.

Unsurprisingly, it does a fine job sucking up wet messes, too, taking just 9 seconds to clear 5 gallons of water.

Pro Tip: Remember to remove the filter before clearing large wet messes.

What we end up with is a very effective wet dry vac for hard surfaces.

Runtime

Runtime is going to vary with the size and number of batteries you use. The Ridgid cordless wet dry vacuum only needs 1 battery to run, but you can use 2 to get more runtime. The second battery is just a runtime extender and doesn’t boost the performance.

Since the motor uses one battery before switching to the other and doesn’t drain them simultaneously, you can use any combination of Ridgid batteries, even if they’re not the same amp-hour. You can even pair Octane and non-Octane packs.

I popped an Octane 9.0Ah battery in the slot to see how long the vac can run. 34 minutes, 25 seconds later, we had our benchmark. You can do a little math to extrapolate from there. A pair of 9Ah batteries get you around 69 minutes. Here are some estimated runtimes for Ridgid’s suite of batteries (these are for 1 battery, double it if you’re using 2):

  • 1.5Ah: 5-1/2 minutes
  • 2.0Ah: 7-1/2 minutes
  • 3.0Ah Octane: 11-1/2 minutes
  • 4.0Ah: 15-1/2 minutes
  • 5.0Ah: 19 minutes
  • 6.0Ah Octane: 23 minutes
  • 9.0Ah Octane: 34-1/2 minutes

General Design

Aside from the battery ports, the Ridgid cordless wet dry vacuum looks like most any of their corded models. The motor assembly snaps onto its 9-gallon canister with a pair of latches and it has the same fit and feel we’ve come to expect.

When you take the vac out of the box, you only need to pop the casters into the covers, slide them into place on each corner, and connect your hose. It’s a completely tool-free installation process.

Each of the caster covers has a slot cut into it to store wand extensions and accessories.

Two points on either side of the handle let you manage the hose if you don’t want to store it in the canister.

Included Accessories

  • 7′ x 1-7/8″ hose
  • 3 extension wands
  • Utility nozzle
  • Car nozzle
  • Wet nozzle
  • Standard filter (preinstalled)

Price

You can snag the Ridgid cordless wet dry vacuum at Home Depot for $119 as a bare tool. There aren’t any kit options at the moment, so you need to supply batteries and a charger separately.

There aren’t any other cordless shop vacs in this size class as a direct comparison. Here’s a quick look at some that are at least in the ballpark for comparison.

  • Ryobi P770 (rolling 6-gallon): $109
  • Milwaukee 0880-20 (handheld 2-gallon): $119
  • DeWalt DCV580H (handheld 2-gallon): $129
  • Ridgid WD0319 (handheld 3-gallon): $99.97
  • Makita XCV11 (handheld 2-gallon): $159.99

The Bottom Line

The Ridgid cordless wet dry vacuum is a no-compromise battery-powered replacement for a corded 9-gallon vac. It has the power to clean up wet and dry messes effectively and is capable of well over an hour of runtime when you use both of its battery ports.

We love this model as a primary option for mobile car cleaning and jobsite cleanup where power is unavailable or at a premium. Its convenience also makes it a great option for any garage or shop.

Ridgid Cordless Wet Dry Vacuum Specifications

  • Model: Ridgid HD0918
  • Power Source: 1 or 2 Ridgid 18V batteries
  • Air Flow: 82 CFM
  • Canister Size: 9 gallons
  • Hose Diameter: 1-7/8″
  • Hose Length: 7′
  • Weight: 16.28 pounds bare
  • Price: $119 bare
  • Warranty: Limited lifetime

 

3
Leave a Reply

avatar
3 Comment threads
0 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
3 Comment authors
LeonardoDerekDave Parry Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Leonardo
Guest
Leonardo

Really nice. Id have to sell a corded one i have to get this one. I have their mini cordless which i bought for 57 cad during a sale
But this one is looking good too.

Derek
Guest
Derek

Wow, impressive. But should’ve been a hybrid. Or better yet,,,why in the hell do they not yet make a 10′ or that plugs into any 120v outlet, and knocks it down to 18, and snaps right into where a battery would normally go. I will never understand why this isn’t done by EVERYONE, so any tool, would have a corded unlimited run time option.

Dave Parry
Guest
Dave Parry

I was not expecting a full hour